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Primaris Psyker conversion

Today's short post is an ode to the advanced headswap. I've just finished off a Primaris Psyker for the mechanised Guard army I painted back in 8th edition, because sometimes you just fancy a palette cleanser. There were however two issues with using the stock kit. For one, I'm not a huge fan of the default head and collar, even if I recognise that shying away from Imperial weirdness is an act of cowardice. Secondly, both Jeff and Tom have already painted the same mini for their armies, and I didn't like the idea of having triplets running around. I'm a special snowflake, and so are my tiny plastic people. Enter a spare head from Statuesque Miniatures, some pinning, and some green stuff. I took a deep breath and snipped off the collar. No going back now.  Pinning the head in place and sculpting a neck, the next move was to smooth over the damage to the cuirass and then get a collar and hair bun in place, since the head's original ponytail didn't feel right.
Recent posts

In Space, No-one Can Hear You Chant

They come with chainaxe, they come with bolters, they come with faith and with their neverborn allies, and now, the biggest assholes in all the galaxy [citation needed] come with far too many spaceships. Yep! It's time that the Word Bearers took to the stars. Being the narrative obsessives that we are, the Beard Bunker crew really, really like a lot of the "auxilliary" games to 40k. We like being able to play out all the story aspects, defending planets, establishing air superiority (if only Chaos had made it to Aeronautica Imperialis before it's demise, if only...), all that stuff we love. Were I a betting man, I'd put money on the most beloved auxilliary game being Battlefleet Gothic. The late lamented game of spaceship combat. Fortunately for us, even in these days of long gone miniatures, the rise of 3d printing and some seriously talented digital sculptors (in this case, the excellent ItalianMoose) give us the chance to continue playing this essential narra

Oops New Battle Company

Look, things just get out of hand sometimes, you know? It was never my intention to collect an entire company, these things just happen.  I was talking to Charlie recently about his long-term goals for his incredibly beautifully painted Cobalt Scions .  Initially he’d planned it to be a small self-contained force as a focussed project, given that he has painted every model to a high character-worthy standards; however as it had kept on growing and he kept on enjoying it he eventually set his sights on a full battle company. For my part I told him that I had no specific intentions of completing a battle company, I was just collecting.  I don’t number my squads anyway, so I really had no sense of how they fitted into the company structure, but given enough time I figured I’d probably get there eventually anyway.  Afterall, I am putting vastly less effort into painting than he is, and my much lower standards mean I can comfortably knock out a unit in a quarter of the time. Curious though,

Immortal Engines

Greetings fellow pals of the Primordial Annihilator! It's been a hot minute since any of the glorious sons of Lorgar have graced the august pixels of this digital journal. I'd kinda fallen off the Chaos wagon a bit; painting four thousand points of the nutcases will do that. But having finished the first phase of the Kessarine I was getting the urge to evil again... and what better evil than giant metal dinosaurs filled with the animating spirit of daemonkind? Since minute one of collecting Word Bearers I knew that I wanted absolute stacks of daemonstuff in the army. After all, we're not even "Chaos is a tool for use" types, we're "Chaos is our bestest friend" types. With a Venomcrawler and sort of a Defiler under my belt it was time to tackle some of the bigger beasts. I knew I wanted one of each of the Maulerfiend and Forgefiend so took the perhaps rash decision to paint 'em as a pair. I'm honestly impressed by how different they've

Modular Urban Board Project Log 6: Repainting the Stupid Sanctum

In mid-2021 I ran face first into a metaphorical brick wall of demotivating architecture. I was never happy with either the look or the efficiency of my original paint job on the Sanctum Administratus , and stalled badly on getting enough of it done to make it a truly useful addition to my terrain collection as a whole, and consequently my modular urban board project in particular. The whole thing rattled to a halt. The original paint job: both too rusty and too clean. Some time later, the Fronteris terrain range came out, and the fast method I developed for painting that stuff was a joy. In the last few months, keen to clear out lingering work-in-progress projects, my eye settled on the stupid, half-finished modular ruin I'd built from 3 sanctum administratus kits. That was a lot of investment sunk into something that wasn't finished enough to be useful (I'd only ever fully painted the intact sections, so it was essentially just a giant urban hill rather than something yo

Squig Destroyer

“What's this?” Sirrus Bizniz asked the nervous-looking mek. Of course, Sirrus knew perfectly well what it was: it was a battlewagon. A big pile of armour on wheels and tracks, designed to transport orks too wimpy for a traditional charge. Sirrus liked his enemies to see him coming. He liked seeing the fear in their eyes as he got closer. The question was not what the battlewagon was, the question was how the mek would try and sell him on an idea that didn't mesh with his Klassik Goff vision for the Metalwaaagh. “Tour bus,” said Zibbitt. This was, to be fair, a pretty strong opening. “Just for transport between battles. We made it big and tough to show that you is the boss.” This was clearly rehearsed. Bignooz had put Zibbitt up to this in case it didn't go down well. It was satisfyingly chunky, and the black paint job was pretty dread, but it felt wrong to see something so big look so toothless. “Needs dakka,” Sirrus said eventually. Zibbitt’s brows furrowed. “You want to

Gunough is gunough

When writing the article about the Invictor warsuit I realised I was getting way off on a tangent about weapons on modern 40k vehicles.  So much so that I realised, you know what?  I have a lot to say on that topic alone. Older readers may recall a time when a vehicle had a listed number of crew, and you could only fire as many weapons as you had crew to fire them.  They also had vehicle damage tables and some of the results involved crew getting killed, so you might need to shuffle the crew around to ensure that the most important weapons were crewed.  So if a vehicle had more guns then crew, either by design or by accident, you had to make tactical choices.  Fun stuff.   These days that level of detail has long since gone the way of the Dodo (for good reasons), along with fire arcs, blast markers, damage table etc.; but with it gone, GW has slowly been increasing the number of guns on its vehicle models.  As such, I’m going to take a look at a bunch of modern(ish) GW vehicles (either