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Sector Munitorum Scenery


When Gee-Dubz brought out their Munitorum Armoured Containers, I was (I thought justifiably) scornful. If your shipping containers have been fitted with a gun, you have strayed from the path of the sane. When that gun is a storm bolter, generally reserved for veteran astartes and the like, you are a swivel-eyed nut enthusiast. When there are two such guns attached to each container, I lose the capacity for words and can only laugh. Uncontrollably.

As with so many GW kits, though, once you dial the thing back down to 10, it becomes great. The preposterous storm bolters are an optional extra, not mandatory, so when the Killzone: Sector Munitorum box came out the sheer discounty goodness made me look again. I then realised I could double down on the deal by picking up the Tempestus Scions kill team - five dudes and another two Munitorum sprues at a discount? I'll take two, thanks. 

So now I have a squad of ten Tempestus Scions storm troopers for my Inquisition warband AND a sexy new heap of terrain. Win.

One thing I didn't build from the kit was the crane - it's not quite big enough to move the shipping containers around, so I've saved it for future projects. Since the carriage has been designed to fit shipping containers as well as the crane, I use it to create moving terrain in games of Kill Team.



The only adjustments I made to the servo-haulers was their enormous antennae; those got replaced with hazard lights from the Sector Imperialis bases sprue. I love the comedy detail on the tractor unit of the totally excessive controls. It radiates the redundant, byzantine nature of the Imperium wonderfully. I've been imagining a hapless trainee in a Departmento Munitorum stockyard being asked to program a simple task into the servo-hauler only to be suffering a total psychological meltdown three hours later as the 59-step ritual of activation leaves him baffled.


The Painting

The crates, barrels and containers were painted and weathered in a bunch of different ways so that they all look like they have different points of origin. Generally speaking, all these methods are extremely quick, since... well... that there's a lot of boxes. Here are some of the salient points in case they're useful to anyone else:
  • For the basic bare metal containers, just drybrush a mid brown (e.g. Mournfang or similar) over a black primer, then drybrush with a dark metal (e.g. boltgun or similar). Follow up with painting some watered down orange (e.g. Ryza Rust or Mig rust effects) into the recesses where water would gather, and you're done. Very basic, but very quick.
  • For the coloured boxes/barrels/containers, basecoat the thing with the colour you want, then if desired, drybrush a slightly lighter shade. For example, the fieldgrey containers were basecoated in Vallejo WW2 German Fieldgrey then drybrushed with Vallejo Green Grey. Next, on the edges and places that would see more wear and tear, sponge on some dark brown (e.g. Vallejo charred brown) followed by some dark metal (boltgun or similar). I used spare foam from a GW carry case. This basic method is described in slightly more detail here, albeit with different colours. Finally, I sloshed some watered down Army Painter Dirt Splatter over the whole thing, then wiped off the excess with a kitchen towel.
  • For the containers with stencilled company names, I started them off as per the bare metal containers. They were then handed over to Mark, who gave them a layer of hairspray, then airbrushed on a layer of colour, then airbrushed through some custom stencils. We then used stippling brushes and busted up drybrushes to chip away at the paint sitting atop the hairspray (best exemplified by the green container). Mark then sealed everything to prevent further chipping. The names Mark used in his stencils are of companies that have appeared in our games; BXK is the corporate acronym of Betancourt-Xing-Kerensky, a Rogue Trader house, whilst 4Sight is the company owned by the family of Siveter Lund, Mark's Inquisition Agent. The green A is for Ardex, another sector-spanning conglomerate that first appeared in an Inquisitor story Mark ran.  I particularly love the logo he designed for Ardex, and the stencils as a whole really bring the containers to life I think. Well played, Assistant Kogz.



The Storm Troopers

The Tempestus Scions kit left me cold for a long time. The bling trim forces you down certain routes when painting them; since it only makes visual sense if painted in a metal colour, any camo or military-type scheme just looks silly, so I was never going to use them in my Guard army. But then, it occurred to me that all that bling works brilliantly for the Inquisition when they're looking to intimidate people with more overt operations. As such, I gave them a paint scheme similar to my Inquisitor. Mmmm, elite minions.


Comments

  1. Hey man, you don't know what's in those containers that need several automatic grenade launchers to protect them. Maybe it's the long overdue shipment of Razzle mags that are the only thing keeping the hive world from collapsing into civil war. That's worth defending with heavy firepower, i think!

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    1. I'm not going to dignify that with a response. Hmm, I suppose this technically IS a response. Dammit!

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    2. In all serious though, they look really great, would create such a cool and atmospheric table for a killteam game/campaign. Great work, bud!

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  2. Fantastic work - love the overall look of your container stacks. I especially like the fine detail paint chipping / erosion you've added to the servo haulers!

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    1. Thanks Goddenzilla. All hail the mighty chipping sponge!

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